Jenny Wren

A couple of weeks ago, we noticed that our little wren, which had been flirting about all over the garden for a couple of weeks, had not returned to her baby chicks .  By now, it was about 7pm and we were getting a bit concerned.  Help from the internet told us that sometimes the nest is left for a  while by the parents in the hope that the chicks will leave the nest and also that towards twilight the chicks would stop chirping and go asleep. We checked about 9.30pm and sure enough, all was quiet.  Sigh of relief.

The next morning, about 7.00am the chicks were madly chirping and there was no sign of our wren.  We phoned Staffordshire Wildlife Trust, who said they would get someone to call and check the nest and if necessary take the chicks away for care at their centre.  In the meantime, it would be beneficial to try and feed the chicks with small caterpillars, spiders and the like!!  Whilst my husband rushed off to the pet shop to buy some mealy worms, I scouted round for caterpillars, but found only one, as they had to be very small ones.

During his absence, one of the little chicks fell from the nest.  I managed to put it in a shoe box, but sadly this one did not survive.

Peter was quite successful in locating the nest entrance, finding two baby wrens and feeding them mealy worms, no small feat.

The man from Staffordshire Wildlife Trust collected the nest about 11.30am and took it away to their centre, saying that we had done a good job in keeping the survivors alive, adding that we could check on their progress tomorrow, which we did and they had both survived the night and were doing well.

I wrote this little poem in remembrance:-

We really thought it wouldn’t be long
Before we’d hear your cheery song
But we waited and waited to no avail
And your dear little chicks began to wail
We sought some help from The Wildlife Trust
Swift action and care was surely a must
To save the lives of your chicks so sweet
With their bright yellow beaks and enormous feet
So wherever you are, be it close or afar
Know that we’ll keep our doors always ajar
In the vain hope of hearing your shrill little songs
And seeing your nest just where it belongs

and here is a photo, albeit not a good one, of the chicks

Jenny Wren

Be back soon.

Marg

 

 

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Posted on August 14, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Lovely story, Margaret. And it reminds me of a time very long ago when we lived in an old urban neighborhood in Philadelphia. There were many cats. As there were trees, in the spring there were birds. One spring day we noticed that a young bird had fallen out of its nest. The mother bird was frantic; she tried and tried to coax the baby bird back to the nest, but the baby bird could not yet fly. Of course, the neighborhood cats saw an opportunity. We knew that we couldn’t just pick up the bird, as it would then be rejected by its mates. What to do?? We ended up spending the day taking shifts warding off the cats and trying to lure the baby bird to a pile of old twigs, from which rescue might be possible. Adult birds were flying reconnaissance missions overhead, occasionally trying to act threatening. And through it all we were holding on to our own baby, who was about a year old. Quite an afternoon. Eventually, all was well – at least, we like to think so.

    Susan H

    Like

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